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Gene Roddenberry's Star Trek: The Original Cast Adventures

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Gene Roddenberry's Star Trek: The Original Cast Adventures is a forthcoming reference book produced by Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. It is edited by Douglas and Shea T. Brode and expected to be released in May 2015.

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Blurb
When it premiered on the NBC network in September 1966, Star Trek was described by its creator, Gene Roddenberry, as "Wagon Train to the stars." Featuring a racially diverse cast, trips to exotic planets, and encounters with an array of alien beings who could be either friendly or hostile, the program opened up new vistas for television. Along with The Twilight Zone and The Outer Limits, Star Trek represented one of the small screen's rare ventures into science fiction during the 1960s. Although the original series was a modest success during its three year run, its afterlife has been nothing less than a cultural phenomenon. To celebrate the show's debut fifty years ago, it's time to reexamine one of the most influential programs in history.
In Gene Roddenberry's Star Trek: The Original Cast Adventures, Douglas and Shea T. Brode present a collection of essays about the NBC series and its various incarnations over the years. Contributors to this volume discuss not only episodes of the 1960s show, but also the off-shoots, ranging from novels and graphic novels to toys and video games, as well as the film versions featuring Captain Kirk, Mr. Spock, and the entire Enterprise crew. The essays cover such topics as the show's religious implications, its romantic elements, and its role in the globalization of American culture. Other essays draw parallels between the show and the Vietnam War, and Star Trek II and Milton's Paradise Lost. Additional essays consider the notion of Roddenberry as an auteur and William Shatner as a romantic object.
With its far-reaching and provocative essays, this collection offers new insights into one of the most significant shows ever produced. Besides television and film studies, Gene Roddenberry's Star Trek – a companion volume to The Star Trek Universe – will be of interest to scholars of gender studies, queer studies, religion, history, and popular culture, not to mention the show's legions of fans around the planet.

Excerpts of copyrighted sources are included for review purposes only, without any intention of infringement.

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